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20130115
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a little smaller since the first of the year. --the result of the payroll tax holiday expiring as part of the fiscal cliff deal. our cover story looks into whether its slowing the economic recovery. not counting a raise or bonus---most of us have a little less take-home pay, not more. january first, the payroll tax went back to 6.2%. "everyone forgot that it was a holiday. a lot of people thought this was the new status quo." it wasn't. and consumers are pretty direct about it. "it adds up to $900 a year. is that significant? yes." "no one likes being taxes. but you don't have a choice." now, if you make 50,000 a year..you'll pay roughly a thousand dollars more in payroll taxes for the year. every two weeks your take-home pay--roughly 36-dollars less. retailers expect it to affect consumer spending. "the likelihood is that it will. we've seen them cutback during the holidays and we expect this 'austerity' to be here for awhile until they get their 'sea-legs' under this program" but getting those sea-legs may take months. "i'm not happy about it. so has it affected your spending? yes, i
't know where we were in taxes, people selling off lots of things, not knowing where capital gains were going to go. now that money is hot. it needs a place to go. people are not thinking interest rates are the place. they are thinking the stock market. they're looking for dividend returns and appreciation. and so far, that is what they are getting. so even on the brakes in the stock market, we are seeing new money flows - big new money flows - coming into the market now. and that will probably continue another week or two. then we'll get back to what i call more normal trading. > commodities traders are on their toes these days, especially with the crop news that has been coming in - we have drought issues, cold issues, and frost issues over in california. what is happening? > > one of the amazing things is, normally when you get a report - we did on friday on final acreage so you can figure out your supplies to a large degree, you often get a limit move one way or the other. they did this report at 11:00 in the session. brand new time. the market did go limit. but i was amazed today,
the election and during this tax battle, it could get even worse, because under a 2010 law, dodd-frank, public companies are supposed to disclose the relationship between what their ceo makes - that's already public information - but they are supposed to compare it and give a ratio with what their median employee, kind of the typical employee, makes. so this is something that people can compare from company to company just to see how much more - "wow, the ceo makes 300 times more than the typical worker here!" > in some companies it wouldn't be that dramatic - an investment bank, for example. but at other companies - you had mentioned earlier wal-mart - it would be a hugely divergent number. > > take goldman sachs. their ceo makes a lot of money, but there are a lot of people at goldman sachs who also make a lot of money. so the disparity wouldn't be as great maybe as wal-mart or some retailer where you have a ceo who probably makes a lot, but you have a lot of minimum-wage workers. so that is going to be a big disparity. > also in corporate governance, we are going to know a little bit more a
Search Results 0 to 2 of about 3